September-seeded clover gives early spring growth

Posted August 28, 2014 at 12:02 pm

Spring-season frost seeding makes an easy way to add clover to grass pasture. Fall seeding works better, says Rob Kallenbach.

Fall rains work legume seeds into the soil just as frost does in February, says the University of Missouri Extension specialist.

Legumes can be overseeded into cool-season pastures just as in spring. The main difference: no snow to show where seed has been spread, Kallenbach says.

Before seeding, pastures should be grazed short to cut competition for legume seedlings. Short grass allows small red or white clover seeds to land on a bare spot of soil. When fall rains come, the rain impact covers the seeds.

“Plant now, the earlier the better,” Kallenbach says. “Longer days give more sunlight to speed clover growth before winter.”

Grass

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    Research has shown that vegetative buffers are very good at controlling sediment and keeping it out of waterways. But what about reducing herbicides?

    “We have a major problem with that in the claypan soils in northeast Missouri,” said Bob Lerch, a soil scientist with the USDA Agricultural Research Service and an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Missouri.

    Lerch and his ARS colleagues decided to see how well buffers reduced herbicides in soils with high runoff potential.

    In 2004, the researchers began working

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    Chapter Degree awarded 3 cc.tif

    CHAPTER DEGREES AWARDED

    Chapter Degree Recipients are: Ashley Brown, Justin Johnson, Mckensi Marshall, Rebeca Posey, Steven Taylor, Kylee Tomason, Chandler Allison, Colby Charles, Logan Perridon, Claire Silvers, Hesston Stark, Chandra Bettis, Shelby Barger, Karlee Collins, Jake Hillsman, Morgan Sumner. Photo submitted by FFA Historiesn Makenzie Schwalm and Jaynee Beaty