Careless mowing and weed eating can kill trees slowly

Posted April 10, 2014 at 1:39 pm

Homeowners might be their trees’ worst enemy if they don’t take care when using mowers and weed eaters around them.

“Trees don’t heal from cuts like we do, so a lawn mower scrape, or a trimmer slash, creates a permanent injury,” said Patrick Byers, horticulture specialist with University of Missouri Extension. “Once the underlying wood is exposed, you’ve put out a welcome sign for diseases and pests to attack your trees.”

Many an older tree has succumbed to internal rot that originated with damage caused years earlier.

According to Byers, there is an easy way to avoid this kind of damage. Remove the grass and weeds from around the tree. Not only will it make it unnecessary to mow near the tree, the tree will not have to compete for the nutrients and water.

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    Sights of spring and gobblers

     

    This weekend, fathers who take their kids turkey hunting on the Youth Hunt, may have a rough time calling in gobblers. It is a very late spring season, and all the turkeys I see are in large flocks. You may see six or seven gobblers all huffed up and strutting, but they are in groups of 20 or 30 hens or more.

    In such situations, they do not gobble much, and they have little interest in a call, no matter how good you are at it. Even grizzled

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    Spoonbilling great in Osage area

    Taberville Report

    by Linda McCallister

    Dains Fish Farm

    Snagging season is doing great.

    Friday, a group of Amish came in, a bunch of kids. The biggest three spoonbills they caught were 77 lbs., 67 lbs. and 56 lbs. So the big ol’ females are coming up.

    They caught them off the bank down here at the Taberville Bridge.

    It’s kind of interesting. The biggest one did didn’t have a bill. I wonder

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    Paddlefish report for April 2

    Below is the paddlefish snagging report for Truman Lake, Lake of the Ozarks, and the Osage River (below Bagnell Dam). With the cold-water temperatures and low flows, snagging continues to be slow on Lake of the Ozarks, Truman Lake and the Osage River. Snaggers are harvesting mostly small fish (34–38 inches) — we continue to see a few larger fish (60-90 pounds). Snaggers continue to catch a lot of small (30–34 inch) sublegal fish. Please get these fish back to the water unharmed immediately! These are the fish

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    LAMAR ANGLER NETS $20,000 BASS

    Lamar angler, Jim Banks, hit the jackpot at the Big Bass Bash held at Lake of the Ozarks. Most days you will find Jim at the Lamar John Deere Dealership, but April 5-6, he and his 13-year-old step-son, Michael Henderson, entered the Big Bass Bash aiming to spend some time together and catch a few fish, hoping for a big one at the right time. Of course, the pressure was on Jim to find some fish so Michael could have a good time catching a lot of fish.

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    Old newspapers can have second life in garden

    Past copies of the daily or weekly newspaper can have a second life in your garden as mulch or a weed barrier.

    Newsprint (but not slick paper used in inserts or magazines) is a great tool for the garden according to Patrick Byers, horticulture specialist with University of Missouri Extension.

    “Even newsprint with color pictures is generally fine since most use biodegradable and water-soluble inks that won’t harm the environment,” said Byers.

    Whether a person is creating a new flower bed, a mulched area

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    It’s time to plant peas

    Peas will never be considered an exotic food, but they’ve been cultivated for at least 5,000 years. This ancient plant is a cool-season vegetable that needs to be planted early.

    “Once the soil warms, the earlier peas are planted in the spring the better,” said David Trinklein, horticulture specialist for University of Missouri Extension. “One problem in Missouri is we can quickly go from a cool spring to a hot summer. High temperatures reduce both quality and yield when growing peas.”

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    Smallmouth Bass

    I want to thank everyone who came to our big swap meet last Saturday. The crowd was the biggest one we have ever had and the place was packed. I think it was the biggest crowd we have had in the five or six or seven years we have done this big event. I surely did enjoy getting to meet so many readers of this newspaper column, and lots of old friends.

    Visitors found some real bargains, and of course

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    Paddlefish snagging report for March 26

    Below is the paddlefish snagging report for Truman Lake, Lake of the Ozarks and the Osage River (below Bagnell Dam). With the cold-water temperatures and low flows, snagging continues to be slow on Lake of the Ozarks, Truman Lake and the Osage River. Snaggers are harvesting mostly small fish (34–38 inches) — we did see a few larger fish up to 60-plus pounds. Snaggers continue to catch a lot of small (30–34 inch) sublegal fish. Please get these fish back to the water unharmed immediately! These are the fish you will be harvesting over the next

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    Crappie, walleye biting, spoonbill moving up

    Taberville Report

    by Linda McCallister

    Dains Fish Farm

    Quite a few of the smaller spoonbill males are moving up. The biggest caught over the weekend was a 71 pound female. Bobby and Sharon’s daughter’s fiancé caught that one out of a boat. They caught several smaller ones and one other keeper. The smaller ones were males.

    Sharon said they have been catching quite a few white cats and channel cats on rod and reel baiting with nightcrawlers. She didn’t specifically

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